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  • #16
    From what I understand (sadly much less than I'd like to) French ships were regarded as handling quite well and being fleet (I'm guessing good streamlining?), Dutch ships frequently has a shallow keel and rounded lower hull to allow stabillity and buoyancy to operate in shallow waters... I'm not sure what, if anything, the British were noted for.

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    • #17
      Dutch were known for shallow draught (good for entering shallow harbors which was useful in the netherlands) and for excellent cargo capacity. They tended to undergun their ships as well. Their first rates were 80 guns. They also did not use plans until considerably later than the other nations.

      French were known for fast ships that handled well under light winds but became difficult to control under heavy seas. They tended to overgun their ships, with considerably more firepower than other nations compared to ship size. They also tended to lightly frame their ships which made them cheaper to build but also less durable.

      English ships were known for more even handling (not necessarily better, but consistent under a variety of conditions), and considerably more hull framing for the size of their ships. They were slower and less heavily gunned than their French counterparts, but also more heavily armoured, easier to handle in heavy weather, and broader in relation to their length). Likewise they were heavier gunned than their dutch counterparts but also unable to pursue them into shallow harbours.

      Spanish ships, like the Danish ones, tended to mix elements of all nations into their designs. Unlike the Danes however, the Spaniards tended to maintain a consistent approach to design. Instead or swapping out elements here and there as desired, they would incorporate the best elements of all nations, thus ending up in the middle range of everything. In the beginning of the PotBS period their lineships were exclusively French designed and built as far as I understand it. Toward the end of the period, having lost much of their Caribbean military might, they developed some of the most advanced cargo ships of the era (the Manila galleons after about 1730). This is part of what prompted Anson's raid against Spanish interests in the Pacific aboard HMS Centurion.

      Oh, one last thing. A rarely mentioned fact that had much more to do with ship design in the later end of the PotBS period than technology or ship stats, was that there was a massive timber shortage going on throughout Europe. The French approached this problem by lightening their ships. The English approached it by building with green wood (which rotted and distorted faster than seasoned wood and caused many ships of the era to decay rapidly or be lost at sea without a trace like the Victory of 1737) I'm no expert on Spanish ships by any means but as far as I can tell they dealt with the issue by building less warships and focusing on the Asia trade, leaving the others to squabble over the Caribbean.
      Last edited by KrisWood; 04-08-2010, 01:03 AM.

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      • #18
        Awesome tutorial Kris! We really need the wiki to be back to put stuff like this in...

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        • #19
          One suggestion: a side elevation, particularly of the headrails and head timbers, would be quite a useful addition

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          • #20
            Didn't the Spanish also build some warships in the Americas? I seem to recall reading about at least one 1st rate built somewhere in South America... can't remember the source now, though. Also, wasn't (at least by the late 18th C.) timber from the North Sea region a vital resource? (though this may have been more fir for masts than oak for hulls)

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            • #21
              @Josh: I don't know, the only spanish first rate I can think of was the Santissima Trinidad, not sure where it was built. I know that 4th rates and smaller were built in Cuba, and some third rates.

              @Xaphod: You mean the one in section 8? If you mean something different please elaborate and I will accommodate

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              • #22
                "@Josh: I don't know, the only spanish first rate I can think of was the Santissima Trinidad, not sure where it was built. I know that 4th rates and smaller were built in Cuba, and some third rates."

                She was build ca. 1759 in Havanna and lost at the Battle of Trafalgar.

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                • #23
                  Kris, I was just thinking an extra side view in steps 5 and 7 would maybe be helpful that's all.

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                  • #24
                    Stickied for the good of the community

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